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Universe of Crypto Planets, Stars & Asteroids from the Milky Way Galaxy on NFTs with power of CryptoCom NFT.

The Milky Way is the Galaxy that includes the Solar System, with the name describing the Galaxy's appearance from Earth: a hazy band of light seen in the night sky formed from stars that cannot be individual.

Jupiter LXIII #301

Jupiter LXIII, provisionally known as S/2017 J 2, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team in 2017, but not announced until July 17, 2018 via a Minor Planet Electronic Circular from the Minor Planet Center. It is about 2 kilometers in diameter and orbits at a semi-major axis of about 23,303,000 km with an inclination of about 166.4°. It belongs to the Carme group.

Isonoe #302

Isonoe /aɪˈsɒnoʊ.iː/, also known as Jupiter XXVI, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 J 6.

Kallichore #303

Kallichore /kəˈlɪkɒriː/, also known as Jupiter XLIV, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003. It received the temporary designation S/2003 J 11.

Erinome #304

Erinome, also known as Jupiter XXV, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 J 4.

Kale #305

Kale /ˈkeɪliː/, also known as Jupiter XXXVII, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered in 2001 by astronomers Scott S. Sheppard, D. Jewitt, and J. Kleyna, and was originally designated as S/2001 J 8.

Eirene #306

Eirene /aɪˈriːniː/, also Jupiter LVII and originally known as S/2003 J 5, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003 but was then lost. It was recovered in 2017 and given its permanent designation that year.

Aitne #307

Aitne /ˈeɪtniː/, also known as Jupiter XXXI, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard, in 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 J 11. Aitne belongs to the Carme group, made up of irregular retrograde moons orbiting Jupiter at a distance ranging between 23 and 24 Gm and at an inclination of about 165°.

Eukelade #308

Eukelade /juːˈkɛlədiː/, also known as Jupiter XLVII, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003, and received the temporary designation S/2003 J 1.

Arche #309

Arche /ˈɑːrkiː/, also known as Jupiter XLIII, is a moon of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard on 31 October 2002, and received the temporary designation S/2002 J 1.

Taygete #310

Taygete /teɪˈɪdʒətiː/, also known as Jupiter XX, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard, in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 J 9.

Jupiter LXXII #311

Jupiter LXXII, originally known as S/2011 J 1, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott Sheppard in 2011. It belongs to the Carme group. This moon was lost after its discovery in 2011. Its recovery was announced on 17 September 2018.

Carme #312

Carme /ˈkɑːrmiː/ is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Seth Barnes Nicholson at Mount Wilson Observatory in California in July 1938. It is named after the mythological Carme, mother by Zeus of Britomartis, a Cretan goddess.

Herse #313

Herse /ˈhɜːrsiː/, or Jupiter L, previously known by its provisional designation of S/2003 J 17, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered on 8 February 2003 by the astronomers Brett J. Gladman, John J. Kavelaars, Jean-Marc Petit, and Lynne Allen and also by a team of astronomers at the University of Hawaii. It was named after Herse 'dew', by some accounts a daughter of Zeus and Selene the moon in Greek mythology, on 11 November 2009. Jupiter LXXI Ersa is also named for the same mythological figure.

Jupiter LXI #314

Jupiter LXI, provisionally known as S/2003 J 19, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers led by Brett J. Gladman, et al. in 2003.

Jupiter LI #315

Jupiter LI, provisionally known as S/2010 J 1, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by R. Jacobson, M. Brozović, B. Gladman, and M. Alexandersen in 2010. It received its permanent number in March 2015. It is now known to circle Jupiter at an average distance of 23.45 million km, taking 2.02 years to complete an orbit around Jupiter. Jupiter LI is about 3 km wide. It is a member of the Carme group.

S/2003 J 9 #316

S/2003 J 9 is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003.

Jupiter LXVI #317

Jupiter LXVI, originally known as S/2017 J 5, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team in 2017, but not announced until July 17, 2018 via a Minor Planet Electronic Circular from the Minor Planet Center. It is about 2 kilometers in diameter and orbits at a semi-major axis of about 23,232,000 km with an inclination of about 164.3°. It belongs to the Carme group.

Jupiter LXVII #318

Jupiter LXVII, originally known as S/2017 J 6, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team in 2017, but not announced until July 17, 2018, via a Minor Planet Electronic Circular from the Minor Planet Center. It is about 2 kilometers in diameter and orbits at a semi-major axis of about 22,455,000 km with an inclination of about 155.2°. It belongs to the Pasiphae group.

Kalyke #319

Kalyke /ˈkæləkiː/, also known as Jupiter XXIII, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 J 2.

Hegemone #320

Hegemone /həˈdʒɛməniː/, also known as Jupiter XXXIX, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003, and given the temporary designation S/2003 J 8.

Pasiphae #321

Pasiphae /pəˈsɪfeɪ.iː/, formerly spelled Pasiphaë, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered in 1908 by Philibert Jacques Melotte and later named after the mythological Pasiphaë, wife of Minos and mother of the Minotaur from Greek legend.

Sponde #322

Sponde /ˈspɒndiː/, also known as Jupiter XXXVI, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 J 5.

S/2003 J 10 #323

S/2003 J 10 is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard et al. in 2003.

Megaclite #324

Megaclite /mɛɡəˈklaɪtiː/, also known as Jupiter XIX, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 J 8.

Cyllene #325

Cyllene /səˈliːniː/, also known as Jupiter XLVIII, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003, receiving the temporary designation S/2003 J 13.

Sinope #326

Sinope /səˈnoʊpiː/ is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter discovered by Seth Barnes Nicholson at Lick Observatory in 1914, and is named after Sinope of Greek mythology.

Jupiter LIX #327

Jupiter LIX, provisionally known as S/2017 J 1, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter on a retrograde orbit. It was reported on June 5, 2017 via a Minor Planet Electronic Circular from the Minor Planet Center. It is believed to be about 2 km in diameter.

Aoede #328

Aoede /eɪˈiːdiː/, also known as Jupiter XLI, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003. It received the temporary designation S/2003 J 7.

Autonoe #329

Autonoe /ɔːˈtɒnoʊ.iː/, also known as Jupiter XXVIII, is a natural satellite of Jupiter.

Callirrhoe #330

Callirrhoe (/kəˈlɪroʊ.iː/; Greek: Καλλιρρόη), also known as Jupiter XVII, is one of Jupiter's outer natural satellites. It is an irregular moon that orbits in a retrograde direction. Callirrhoe was imaged by Spacewatch at Kitt Peak National Observatory from October 6 through November 4, 1999, and originally designated as asteroid 1999 UX18. It was discovered to be in orbit around Jupiter by Tim Spahr on July 18, 2000, and then given the designation S/1999 J 1. It was the 17th confirmed moon of Jupiter.

S/2003 J 23 #331

S/2003 J 23 is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard et al. in 2004 from pictures taken in 2003.

Kore #332

Kore /ˈkɔːriː/, also known as Jupiter XLIX, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003 and given the provisional designation S/2003 J 14.

Phobos #333

Phobos (/ˈfoʊbɒs/; systematic designation: Mars I) is the innermost and larger of the two natural satellites of Mars, the other being Deimos. The two moons were discovered in 1877 by American astronomer Asaph Hall. Phobos is named after the Greek deity Phobos, a son of Ares (Mars) and twin brother of Deimos.

Deimos #334

Deimos /ˈdaɪməs/ (systematic designation: Mars II) is the smaller and outermost of the two natural satellites of Mars, the other being Phobos. Of similar composition to C and D-type asteroids, Deimos has a mean radius of 6.2 km (3.9 mi) and takes 30.3 hours to orbit Mars. Deimos is 23,460 km (14,580 mi) from Mars, much farther than Mars's other moon, Phobos. It is named after Deimos, the Ancient Greek god and personification of dread and terror.

Ceres #335

Ceres (2.77 AU (414 million km; 257 million mi) from the Sun) is the largest asteroid, a protoplanet, and a dwarf planet.[d] It has a diameter of slightly under 1,000 km (620 mi), and a mass large enough for its own gravity to pull it into a spherical shape. Ceres was considered a planet when it was discovered in 1801, but as further observations revealed additional asteroids, it became common to consider it as one of the minor rather than major planets. It was then reclassified again as a dwarf planet in 2006 when the IAU definition of planet was established.

55576 Amycus #336

55576 Amycus /ˈæmɪkəs/ is a centaur discovered on 8 April 2002 by the NEAT at Palomar. The minor planet was named for Amycus, a male centaur in Greek mythology.

704 Interamnia #337

704 Interamnia is a large F-type asteroid. With a mean diameter of around 330 kilometres, it is the fifth-largest asteroid, after Ceres, Vesta, Pallas and Hygiea. Its mean distance from the Sun is 3.067 (AU). It was discovered on 2 October 1910 by Vincenzo Cerulli, and named after the Latin name for Teramo, Italy, where Cerulli worked. Its mass is probably between fifth and tenth highest in the asteroid belt, with a mass estimated to be 1.2% of the mass of the entire asteroid belt.

Davida #338

Davida (minor planet designation: 511 Davida) is a large C-type asteroid. It is the one of the largest asteroids; approximately tied for 7th place, to within measurement uncertainties, and the 5th or 6th most massive. It was discovered by R. S. Dugan in 1903. Davida is named after David Peck Todd, an astronomy professor at Amherst College.

Pallas #339

Pallas (minor-planet designation: 2 Pallas) is the second asteroid to have been discovered, after Ceres. It is believed to have a mineral composition similar to carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, like Ceres, though significantly less hydrated than Ceres.

Vesta #340

Vesta (minor-planet designation: 4 Vesta) is one of the largest objects in the asteroid belt, with a mean diameter of 525 kilometres (326 mi). It was discovered by the German astronomer Heinrich Wilhelm Matthias Olbers on 29 March 1807 and is named after Vesta, the virgin goddess of home and hearth from Roman mythology.

Sylvia #341

Sylvia (minor planet designation: 87 Sylvia) is the one of the largest asteroids (approximately tied for 7th place, to within measurement uncertainties). It is the parent body of the Sylvia family and member of Cybele group located beyond the main asteroid belt (see minor-planet groups). Sylvia was the first asteroid known to possess more than one moon.

Eunomia #342

Eunomia (minor planet designation 15 Eunomia) is a very large asteroid in the inner asteroid belt. It is the largest of the stony (S-type) asteroids, with 3 Juno as a close second. It is quite a massive asteroid, in 6th to 8th place (to within measurement uncertainties). It is the largest Eunomian asteroid, and is estimated to contain 1% of the mass of the asteroid belt.

Euphrosyne #343

Euphrosyne (minor planet designation: 31 Euphrosyne) is a very young asteroid. It is the one of the largest asteroids (approximately tied for 7th place, to within measurement uncertainties). It was discovered by James Ferguson on September 1, 1854, the first asteroid found from North America. It is named after Euphrosyne, one of the Charites in Greek mythology.

Hektor #344

Hektor /ˈhɛktər/ is the largest Jupiter trojan and the namesake of the Hektor family, with a highly elongated shape equivalent in volume to a sphere of approximately 225 to 250 kilometers diameter. It was discovered on 10 February 1907, by astronomer August Kopff at Heidelberg Observatory in southwest Germany, and named after the Trojan prince Hector, from Greek mythology. It has one small 12-kilometer sized satellite, Skamandrios, discovered in 2006.

Juno #345

Juno is a large asteroid in the asteroid belt. Juno was the third asteroid discovered, in 1804, by German astronomer Karl Harding. It is one of the twenty largest asteroids and one of the two largest stony (S-type) asteroids, along with 15 Eunomia. It is estimated to contain 1% of the total mass of the asteroid belt.

Earth #346

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life. While large volumes of water can be found throughout the Solar System, only Earth sustains liquid surface water. About 71% of Earth's surface is made up of the ocean, dwarfing Earth's polar ice, lakes, and rivers. The remaining 29% of Earth's surface is land, consisting of continents and islands. Earth's surface layer is formed of several slowly moving tectonic plates, interacting to produce mountain ranges, volcanoes, and earthquakes. Earth's liquid outer core generates the magnetic field that shapes Earth's magnetosphere, deflecting destructive solar winds.

Camilla #347

Camilla (minor planet designation: 107 Camilla) is one of the largest asteroids from the outermost edge of the asteroid belt, approximately 250 kilometers (160 miles) in diameter. It is a member of the Sylvia family and located within the Cybele group. It was discovered on 17 November 1868, by English astronomer Norman Pogson at Madras Observatory, India, and named after Camilla, Queen of the Volsci in Roman mythology. The X-type asteroid is a rare trinary asteroid with two minor-planet moons discovered in 2001 and 2016, respectively. It is elongated in shape and has a short rotation period of 4.8 hours.

Cybele #348

Cybele, minor planet designation 65 Cybele, is one of the largest asteroids in the Solar System and is located in the outer asteroid belt. It gives its name to the Cybele group of asteroids that orbit outward from the Sun from the 2:1 orbital resonance with Jupiter. The X-type asteroid has a relatively short rotation period of 6.0814 hours. It was discovered by Wilhelm Tempel in 1861, and named after Cybele, the earth goddess.

Patientia #349

Patientia (minor planet designation: 451 Patientia) is approximately the 15th-largest asteroid in the asteroid belt with a diameter of 225 km. It was discovered by French astronomer Auguste Charlois on 4 December 1899, and assigned a provisional designation 1899 EY.

Bamberga #350

Bamberga (minor planet designation: 324 Bamberga) is one of the largest asteroids in the asteroid belt. It was discovered by Johann Palisa on 25 February 1892 in Vienna. It is one of the top-20 largest asteroids in the asteroid belt. Apart from the near-Earth asteroid Eros, it was the last asteroid which is ever easily visible with binoculars to be discovered.

Thisbe #351

Thisbe, minor planet designation 88 Thisbe, is the 13th largest main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by C. H. F. Peters on June 15, 1866, and named after Thisbe, heroine of a Roman fable. An occultation of a star by Thisbe was observed on October 7, 1981. Results from the occultation indicate a larger than expected diameter of 232 km.

Doris #352

Doris (minor planet designation: 48 Doris) is one of the largest main belt asteroids. It was discovered on 19 September 1857 by Hermann Goldschmidt from his balcony in Paris.

Themis #353

Themis (minor planet designation: 24 Themis) is one of the largest asteroids in the asteroid belt. It is also the largest member of the Themistian family. It was discovered by Annibale de Gasparis on 5 April 1853. It is named after Themis, the personification of natural law and divine order in Greek mythology. Not to be confused with 269 Justitia, named for Justitia, Themis' Roman name.

Amphitrite #354

Amphitrite (minor planet designation: 29 Amphitrite) is one of the largest S-type asteroids, approximately 200 kilometers (120 miles) in diameter, and probably fifth largest after Eunomia, Juno, Iris and Herculina.

Egeria #355

Egeria (minor planet designation: 13 Egeria) is a large main-belt G-type asteroid. It was discovered by Annibale de Gasparis on November 2, 1850. Egeria was named by Urbain Le Verrier, whose computations led to the discovery of Neptune, after the mythological nymph Egeria of Aricia, Italy, the wife of Numa Pompilius, second king of Rome.

Psyche #356

Psyche (/ˈsaɪkiː/) is a large M-type asteroid discovered by the Italian astronomer Annibale de Gasparis, working in Naples, on 17 March 1852 and named after the Greek mythological figure Psyche. The prefix "16" signifies that it was the sixteenth minor planet in order of discovery. It is the largest and most massive of the M-type asteroids, and one of the dozen most massive asteroids. It has a mean diameter of approximately 220 kilometres (140 mi) and contains about one percent of the mass of the asteroid belt. Historically, it was hypothesized to be the exposed core of a protoplanet, but numerous recent studies have all but ruled that out. Psyche will be explored by the spacecraft of the same name, with launch planned in 2023 and arrival in 2029.

Iris #357

Iris (minor planet designation: 7 Iris) is a large main-belt asteroid and perhaps remnant planetesimal orbiting the Sun between Mars and Jupiter. It is the fourth-brightest object in the asteroid belt. It is classified as an S-type asteroid, meaning that it has a stony composition.

Diotomia #358

Diotima (minor planet designation: 423 Diotima) is one of the larger main-belt asteroids. It is classified as a C-type asteroid and is probably composed of primitive carbonaceous material. It was discovered by Auguste Charlois on 7 December 1896, in Nice. In the late 1990s, a network of astronomers worldwide gathered lightcurve data that was ultimately used to derive the spin states and shape models of 10 new asteroids, including 423 Diotima. The light curve for this asteroid varies "a lot" depending on the position, with the brightness variations ranging from almost zero to up to 0.2 in magnitude. Dunham (2002) used 15 chords and obtained an estimated size of 171 x 138 km.

Hebe #359

Hebe /ˈhiːbiː/ (minor planet designation: 6 Hebe) is a large main-belt asteroid, containing around 0.5% of the mass of the belt. However, due to its apparently high bulk density (greater than that of the Moon or even Mars), Hebe does not rank among the top twenty asteroids by volume. This high bulk density suggests an extremely solid body that has not been impacted by collisions, which is not typical of asteroids of its size – they tend to be loosely-bound rubble piles.

Eugenia #360

Eugenia (minor planet designation: 45 Eugenia) is a large asteroid of the asteroid belt. It is famed as one of the first asteroids to be found to have a moon orbiting it. It was also the second triple asteroid to be discovered, after 87 Sylvia.

Daphne #361

Daphne (minor planet designation: 41 Daphne) is a large asteroid from the asteroid belt. It is a dark-surfaced body 174 km in diameter is probably composed of primitive carbonaceous chondrites. The spectra of the asteroid displays evidence of aqueous alteration. It was discovered by H. Goldschmidt on May 22, 1856, and named after Daphne, the nymph in Greek mythology who was turned into a laurel tree. Incorrect orbital calculations initially resulted in 56 Melete being mistaken for a second sighting of Daphne. Daphne was not sighted again until August 31, 1862.

Metis #362

Metis (minor planet designation: 9 Metis) is one of the larger main-belt asteroids. It is composed of silicates and metallic nickel-iron, and may be the core remnant of a large asteroid that was destroyed by an ancient collision. Metis is estimated to contain just under half a percent of the total mass of the asteroid belt. Metis passed within 0.034AU, or 5,000,000 kilometres (3,100,000 mi), of Vesta on 19 August 2004.

Herculina #363

Herculina /hɜːrkjʊˈlaɪnə/ is a large asteroid, with a diameter of around 200 km.

Eleonora #364

Eleonora (minor planet designation: 354 Eleonora) is a large, stony main-belt asteroid that was discovered by the French astronomer Auguste Charlois on January 17, 1893, in Nice.

Nemesis #365

Nemesis (minor planet designation: 128 Nemesis) is a large 180 km main-belt asteroid, of carbonaceous composition. It rotates rather slowly, taking about 78 hours to complete one rotation. Nemesis is the largest member of the Nemesian asteroid family bearing its name. It was discovered by J. C. Watson on 25 November 1872, and named after Nemesis, the goddess of retribution in Greek mythology.

Aurora #366

Aurora (minor planet designation: 94 Aurora) is one of the largest main-belt asteroids. With an albedo of only 0.04, it is darker than soot, and has a primitive composition consisting of carbonaceous material. It was discovered by J. C. Watson on September 6, 1867, in Ann Arbor, and named after Aurora, the Roman goddess of the dawn.

Elektra #367

Elektra (minor planet designation: 130 Elektra) is a large outer main-belt asteroid and quadruple system with three minor-planet moons. It was discovered on 17 February 1873, by astronomer Christian Peters at Litchfield Observatory, New York, and named after Electra, an avenger in Greek mythology.

Ursula #368

Ursula (minor planet designation: 375 Ursula), provisional designation 1893 AL, is a dark asteroid and parent body of the Ursula family from the outer regions of the asteroid belt. It is one of the largest asteroids with a diameter of approximately 200 kilometers. It was discovered on 18 September 1893, by French astronomer Auguste Charlois at Nice Observatory in France. The referent of the asteroids's name is unknown.

Alauda #369

Alauda /əˈlɔːdə/, provisional designation 1910 KQ, is a carbonaceous asteroid and binary system from the outer asteroid belt, approximately 190 kilometers in diameter. It is the parent body of the Alauda family. Discovered in 1910 by German astronomer Joseph Helffrich at Heidelberg Observatory, it was named after the lark. Its small moon, named Pichi üñëm, was discovered in 2007.

Hermione #370

Hermione (minor planet designation: 121 Hermione) is a very large binary asteroid discovered in 1872. It orbits in the Cybele group in the far outer asteroid belt. As an asteroid of the dark C spectral type, it is probably composed of carbonaceous materials. In 2002, a small moon was found to be orbiting Hermione.

Aletheia #371

Aletheia (minor planet designation: 259 Aletheia) is a very large main-belt asteroid that was discovered by German–American astronomer Christian Peters on June 28, 1886, at Litchfield Observatory, Clinton, New York. The dark and heterogeneously composed X-type (Tholen: CP-type) asteroid contains primitive carbonaceous materials, responsible for its low albedo of 0.04. Aletheia measures about 185 kilometers in diameter and belongs to the largest asteroids of the main-belt. It has a semi-major axis of 3.1 AU and an orbit inclined by 11 degrees with a period of 5.55 years.

Palma #372

Palma (minor planet designation: 372 Palma) is one of the largest main-belt asteroids. It is a B-type asteroid. It was discovered by Auguste Charlois on August 19, 1893, in Nice. It is thought to be named for the capital city of Majorca, an island in the Balearics (Spain), which are located south of France. It is one of seven of Charlois's discoveries that were expressly named by the Astromomisches Rechen-Institut (Astronomical Calculation Institute).

Lachesis #373

Lachesis (minor planet designation: 120 Lachesis) is a large main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by French astronomer Alphonse Borrelly on April 10, 1872, and independently by German-American astronomer Christian Heinrich Friedrich Peters on April 11, 1872, then named after Lachesis, one of the Moirai, or Fates, in Greek mythology. A Lachesean occultation of a star occurred in 1999 and was confirmed visually by five observers and once photoelectrically, with the chords yielding an estimated elliptical cross-section of 184 × 144 km.

Amycus #374

Amycus /ˈæmɪkəs/ is a centaur discovered on 8 April 2002 by the NEAT at Palomar. The minor planet was named for Amycus, a male centaur in Greek mythology. It came to perihelion in February 2003. Data from the Spitzer Space Telescope gave a diameter of 76.3±12.5 km. A low probability asteroid occultation of star UCAC2 17967364 with an apparent magnitude of +13.8 was possible on 11 February 2009.[8] Another such event involving a star with an apparent magnitude of +12.9 occurred on 10 April 2014 at about 10:46 Universal Time, visible for observers in the southwest US and western Mexico.

Bienor #375

Bienor /baɪˈiːnɔːr/ is a centaur that grazes the orbit of Uranus. It is named after the mythological centaur Bienor. Its closest approach to the Sun (perihelion) is 13.2 AU. As of 2020, Bienor is 14.2 AU from the Sun and will reach perihelion in January 2028. It measured approximately 198 kilometers (120 miles) in diameter.

Hylonome #376

Hylonome (/haɪˈlɒnəmiː/; prov. designation: 1995 DW2) is a minor planet orbiting in the outer Solar System. The dark and icy body belongs to the class of centaurs and measures approximately 72 kilometers (45 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 27 February 1995, by English astronomer David C. Jewitt and Vietnamese American astronomer Jane Luu at the U.S. Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii, and later named after the mythological creature Hylonome.

Chariklo #377

Chariklo /ˈkærəkloʊ/ is the largest confirmed centaur (small body of the outer Solar System). It orbits the Sun between Saturn and Uranus, grazing the orbit of Uranus. On 26 March 2014, astronomers announced the discovery of two rings (nicknamed as the rivers Oiapoque and Chuí) around Chariklo by observing a stellar occultation, making it the first minor planet known to have rings. A photometric study in 2001 was unable to find a definite period of rotation. Infrared observations of Chariklo indicate the presence of water ice, which may in fact be located in its rings. Michael Brown's website lists it as possibly a dwarf planet with a measured diameter of 232 km.

Fortuna #378

Fortuna (minor planet designation: 19 Fortuna) is one of the largest main-belt asteroids. It has a composition similar to 1 Ceres: a darkly colored surface that is heavily space-weathered with the composition of primitive organic compounds, including tholins.