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Universe of Crypto Planets, Stars & Asteroids from the Milky Way Galaxy on NFTs with power of Ethereum blockchain.

The Milky Way is the Galaxy that includes the Solar System, with the name describing the Galaxy's appearance from Earth: a hazy band of light seen in the night sky formed from stars that cannot be individual.

Jarnsaxa #201

Jarnsaxa /jɑːrnˈsæksə/, also known as Saturn L (provisional designation S/2006 S 6), is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Jan Kleyna, and Brian G. Marsden on June 26, 2006, from observations taken between January 5 and April 29, 2006. Jarnsaxa is about 6 kilometres in diameter, and orbits Saturn at an average distance of 18,556.9 Mm in 943.784 days, at an inclination of 162.9° to the ecliptic (164.1° to Saturn's equator), in a retrograde direction and with an eccentricity of 0.1918. It is a member of the Norse group of irregular satellites. It is named after Járnsaxa, a giantess in Norse mythology.

Suttungr #202

Suttungr /ˈsʊtʊŋər/, or Saturn XXIII, is a natural satellite of Saturn. It was discovered by Brett J. Gladman, et al. in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 S 12. It was named for Suttungr in Norse mythology, a Jötunn or giant who once owned the mead of poetry.

Eggther #203

Eggther (Saturn LIX), provisionally known as S/2004 S 27, is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan Kleyna on October 7, 2019 from observations taken between December 12, 2004 and March 21, 2007. It was given its permanent designation in August 2021. On 24 August 2022, it was officially named after Eggþér, a jötunn from Norse mythology. He is the herder of the female jötunn (probably Angrboða) who lives in Járnviðr (Ironwood) and raises monstrous wolves. In the poem Völuspá, Eggþér is described as sitting on a mound and joyfully striking his harp while the red rooster Fjalarr begins to crow to herald the onset of Ragnarök.

Thrymr #204

Thrymr /ˈθrɪmər/, or Saturn XXX, is a natural satellite of Saturn. It was discovered by Gladman and colleagues in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 S 7. Its name comes from Norse mythology, where Thrymr is a Jotun.

Angrboda #205

Angrboda (Saturn LV), provisionally known as S/2004 S 22, is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan Kleyna on October 7, 2019 from observations taken between December 12, 2004 and February 1, 2006. It was given its permanent designation in August 2021. On 24 August 2022, it was officially named after Angrboða, a jötunn in Norse mythology. She is the consort of Loki and the mother of the wolf Fenrir, the Midgard serpent Jörmungandr, and the ruler of the dead Hel.hjh

Beli #206

Beli (Saturn LXI), provisionally known as S/2004 S 30, is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan Kleyna on October 7, 2019 from observations taken between December 12, 2004 and March 21, 2007. It was given its permanent designation in August 2021. On 24 August 2022, it was named after Beli, a jötunn from Norse mythology. He is killed by Freyr with the antler of a hart (stag). According to John Lindow, the myth of Beli is partially lost. Some scholars suggest that he may be the brother of Freyr's wife Gerðr, although this is uncertain.

Gerd #207

Gerd (Saturn LVII), provisionally known as S/2004 S 25, is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan Kleyna on October 7, 2019 from observations taken between December 12, 2004 and March 22, 2007. It was given its permanent designation in August 2021. On 24 August 2022, it was officially named after Gerðr, a jötunn from Norse mythology. She is the wife of Freyr and the personification of fertile soil.

Gunnlod #208

Gunnlod (Saturn LXII), provisionally known as S/2004 S 32, is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan Kleyna on October 8, 2019 from observations taken between December 12, 2004 and January 19, 2007. It was given its permanent designation in August 2021. On 24 August 2022, it was officially named after Gunnlǫð, a jötunn from Norse mythology. She is the daughter of Suttungr and guarded the mead of poetry for him. But Odin in the form of a snake gained access to the chamber in Hnitbjorg where the mead was kept, seduced Gunnlǫð, and slept with her for three nights. In return Gunnlǫð allowed Odin three drinks of the mead, and he then immediately flew out of the cavern in the form of an eagle.

Skrymir #209

Skrymir (Saturn LVI), provisionally known as S/2004 S 23, is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan Kleyna on October 7, 2019 from observations taken between December 12, 2004 and March 22, 2007. It was given its permanent designation in August 2021. On 24 August 2022, it was officially named after Útgarða-Loki (also known as Skrýmir). He is a jötunn from Norse mythology and master of illusions.

Alvaldi #210

Alvaldi (Saturn LXV), provisionally known as S/2004 S 35, is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan Kleyna on October 8, 2019 from observations taken between December 12, 2004 and February 25, 2006. It was given its permanent designation in August 2021. On 24 August 2022, it was officially named after Alvaldi, a jötunn from Norse mythology. He was very rich in gold, and when he died his sons divided his inheritance by taking a mouthful each.

Kari #211

Kari or Saturn XLV is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Jan Kleyna, and Brian G. Marsden on 26 June 2006 from observations taken between January and April 2006.

Geirrod #212

Geirrod (Saturn LXVI), provisionally known as S/2004 S 38, is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan Kleyna on October 8, 2019 from observations taken between December 12, 2004 and March 22, 2007. It was given its permanent designation in August 2021. On 24 August 2022, it was officially named after Geirröðr, a jötunn from Norse mythology. He is an enemy of Thor and is killed by him.

Fenrir #213

Fenrir /ˈfɛnrɪər/, or Saturn XLI (provisional designation S/2004 S 16), is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Jan Kleyna, and Brian G. Marsden on May 4, 2005, from observations taken between December 13, 2004, and March 5, 2005. Fenrir has an apparent magnitude of 25, making it one of the faintest known moons in the Solar System, and was discovered using some of the largest telescopes in the world. It is even too dark to have been observed by the Cassini spacecraft when it was in orbit around Saturn, for which it never got brighter than approximately 17th apparent magnitude. Fenrir was named after Fenrisulfr, a giant wolf from Norse mythology, father of Hati and Skoll, son of Loki, destined to break its bonds for Ragnarök.

Loge #214

Loge or Saturn XLVI is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Jan Kleyna, and Brian G. Marsden on 26 June 2006, from observations taken between January and April 2006. Loge is about 6 kilometres in diameter, and orbits Saturn at an average distance of 23,142,000 km in 1314.364 days, at an inclination of 166.5° to the ecliptic (165.3° to Saturn's equator), in a retrograde direction and with an eccentricity of 0.1390. It has a rotation period of about 6.9±0.1 hours. It was named in April 2007, after Logi, a fire giant from Norse mythology.

Ymir #215

Ymir /ˈiːmɪər/, or Saturn XIX, is a retrograde irregular moon of Saturn. It was discovered by Brett J. Gladman, et al. in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 S 1. It was named in August 2003, from Norse mythology, where Ymir is the ancestor of all the Jotuns or frost giants. It takes 3.6 Earth years to complete an orbit around Saturn. Of the moons that take more than 3 Earth years to orbit Saturn, Ymir is the largest, at about 18 kilometres (11 miles) in diameter.

Thiazzi #216

Thiazzi (Saturn LXIII), provisionally known as S/2004 S 33, is a natural satellite of Saturn. Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan Kleyna on October 8, 2019 from observations taken between December 12, 2004 and March 22, 2007. It was given its permanent designation in August 2021. On 24 August 2022, it was officially named after Þjazi, a jötunn from Norse mythology. He is a son of Alvaldi and kidnapped the goddess Iðunn, who guarded the apples of the gods.

Fornjot #217

Fornjot /ˈfɔːrnjoʊt/ or Saturn XLII is the third outermost natural satellite of Saturn (after S/2004 S 34 and S/2004 S 26). Its discovery was announced by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Jan Kleyna, and Brian G. Marsden on 4 May 2005 from observations taken between 12 December 2004, and 11 March 2005.

Naiad #218

Naiad /ˈneɪəd/, (also known as Neptune III and previously designated as S/1989 N 6) named after the naiads of Greek legend, is the innermost satellite of Neptune and the nearest to the center of any gas giant with moons with a distance of 48,224 km from the planet's center. Its orbital period is less than a Neptunian day, resulting in tidal dissipation that will cause its orbit to decay. Eventually it will either crash into Neptune's atmosphere or break up to become a new ring.

Thalassa #219

Thalassa /θəˈlæsə/, also known as Neptune IV, is the second-innermost satellite of Neptune. Thalassa was named after sea goddess Thalassa, a daughter of Aether and Hemera from Greek mythology. "Thalassa" is also the Greek word for "sea".

Despina #220

Despina /dɛˈspaɪnə/, also known as Neptune V, is the third-closest inner moon of Neptune. It is named after Greek mythological character Despoina, a nymph who was a daughter of Poseidon and Demeter.

Galatea #221

Galatea /ɡæləˈtiːə/, also known as Neptune VI, is the fourth-closest inner moon of Neptune. It is named after Galatea, one of the fifty Nereids of Greek legend, with whom Cyclops Polyphemus was vainly in love.

Larissa #222

Larissa, also known as Neptune VII, is the fifth-closest inner satellite of Neptune. It is named after Larissa, a lover of Poseidon (Neptune) in Greek mythology and eponymous nymph of the city in Thessaly, Greece.

Hippocamp #223

Hippocamp, also designated Neptune XIV, is a small moon of Neptune discovered on 1 July 2013. It was found by astronomer Mark Showalter by analyzing archived Neptune photographs the Hubble Space Telescope captured between 2004 and 2009. The moon is so dim that it was not observed when the Voyager 2 space probe flew by Neptune and its moons in 1989.

Proteus #224

Proteus (/ˈproʊtiːəs/), also known as Neptune VIII, is the second-largest Neptunian moon, and Neptune's largest inner satellite. Discovered by Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1989, it is named after Proteus, the shape-changing sea god of Greek mythology. Proteus orbits Neptune in a nearly equatorial orbit at a distance of about 4.75 times the radius of Neptune's equator.

Triton #225

Triton is the largest natural satellite of the planet Neptune, and was the first Neptunian moon to be discovered, on October 10, 1846, by English astronomer William Lassell. It is the only large moon in the Solar System with a retrograde orbit, an orbit in the direction opposite to its planet's rotation. Because of its retrograde orbit and composition similar to Pluto, Triton is thought to have been a dwarf planet, captured from the Kuiper belt.ff

Nereid #226

Nereid, or Neptune II, is the third-largest moon of Neptune. It has the most eccentric orbit of all known moons in the Solar System. It was the second moon of Neptune to be discovered, by Gerard Kuiper in 1949.

Halimede #227

Halimede /hæləˈmiːdiː/, or Neptune IX, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Neptune. It was discovered by Matthew J. Holman, John J. Kavelaars, Tommy Grav, Wesley C. Fraser and Dan Milisavljevic on August 14, 2002.

Sao #228

Sao /ˈseɪ.oʊ/ is a prograde irregular satellite of Neptune. It was discovered by Matthew J. Holman et al. on August 14, 2002.

Laomedeia #229

Laomedeia /ˌleɪəməˈdiːə/, also known as Neptune XII, is a prograde irregular satellite of Neptune. It was discovered by Matthew J. Holman, et al. on August 13, 2002. Before the announcement of its name on February 3, 2007 (IAUC 8802), it was known as S/2002 N 3. It orbits Neptune at a distance of about 23,571,000 km and is about 42 kilometers in diameter (assuming albedo of 0.04). It is named after Laomedeia, one of the 50 Nereids.f

Psamathe #230

Psamathe /ˈsæməθiː/, also known as Neptune X, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Neptune. It is named after Psamathe, one of the Nereids. Psamathe was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and David C. Jewitt in 2003 using the 8.2 meter Subaru telescope. Before the announcement of its name on February 3, 2007 (IAUC 8802), it was known by the provisional designation S/2003 N 1.

Neso #231

Neso /ˈniːsoʊ/, also known as Neptune XIII, is the outermost known natural satellite of Neptune. It is an irregular moon discovered by Matthew J. Holman, Brett J. Gladman, et al. on August 14, 2002, though it went unnoticed until 2003. Neso orbits Neptune at a distance of more than 48 Gm (million km), making it (as of 2015) the most distant known moon of any planet. At apocenter, the satellite is more than 72 Gm from Neptune. This distance is great enough to exceed Mercury's aphelion, which is approximately 70 Gm from the Sun.

Juliet #232

Juliet is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on 3 January 1986, and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 2. It is named after the heroine of William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet. It is also designated Uranus XI.f

Portia #233

Portia is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on 3 January 1986, and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 1. The moon is named after Portia, the heroine of William Shakespeare's play The Merchant of Venice. It is also designated Uranus XII.

Rosalind #234

Rosalind is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on 13 January 1986, and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 4. It was named after the daughter of the banished Duke in William Shakespeare's play As You Like It. It is also designated Uranus XIII.

Cupid #235

Cupid is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered by Mark R. Showalter and Jack J. Lissauer in 2003 using the Hubble Space Telescope. It was named after a character in William Shakespeare's play Timon of Athens. It is the smallest known inner Uranian satellite, crudely estimated to be only about 18 km in diameter. This and the dark surface made it too dim to be detected by the Voyager 2 cameras during its Uranus flyby in 1986.

Belinda #236

Belinda is an inner satellite of the planet Uranus. Belinda was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on 13 January 1986 and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 5. It is named after the heroine of Alexander Pope's The Rape of the Lock. It is also designated Uranus XIV.

Perdita #237

Perdita /ˈpɜːrdətə/ is an inner satellite of Uranus. Perdita's discovery was complicated. The first photographs of Perdita were taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1986, but it was not recognized from the photographs for more than a decade. In 1999, the moon was noticed by Erich Karkoschka and reported. But because no further pictures could be taken to confirm its existence, it was officially demoted in 2001. However, in 2003, pictures taken by the Hubble Space Telescope managed to pick up an object where Perdita was supposed to be, finally confirming its existence.

Puck #238

Puck is an inner moon of Uranus. It was discovered in December 1985 by the Voyager 2 spacecraft. The name Puck follows the convention of naming Uranus's moons after characters from Shakespeare. The orbit of Puck lies between the rings of Uranus and the first of Uranus's large moons, Miranda. Puck is approximately spherical in shape and has diameter of about 162 km. It has a dark, heavily cratered surface, which shows spectral signs of water ice.

Mab #239

Mab, or Uranus XXVI, is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered by Mark R. Showalter and Jack J. Lissauer in 2003 using the Hubble Space Telescope. It was named after Queen Mab, a fairy queen from English folklore who is mentioned in William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet. Because the moon is small and dark, it was not seen in the heavily scrutinized images taken by Voyager 2 during its Uranus flyby in 1986. However, it is brighter than another moon, Perdita, which was discovered from Voyager's photos in 1997. This led scientists to re-examine the old photos again, and the satellite was finally found in the images.

Miranda #240

Miranda, also designated Uranus V, is the smallest and innermost of Uranus's five round satellites. It was discovered by Gerard Kuiper on 16 February 1948 at McDonald Observatory in Texas, and named after Miranda from William Shakespeare's play The Tempest. Like the other large moons of Uranus, Miranda orbits close to its planet's equatorial plane. Because Uranus orbits the Sun on its side, Miranda's orbit is perpendicular to the ecliptic and shares Uranus' extreme seasonal cycle.

Ariel #241

Ariel is the fourth-largest of the 27 known moons of Uranus. Ariel orbits and rotates in the equatorial plane of Uranus, which is almost perpendicular to the orbit of Uranus and so has an extreme seasonal cycle. It was discovered in October 1851 by William Lassell and named for a character in two different pieces of literature. As of 2019, much of the detailed knowledge of Ariel derives from a single flyby of Uranus performed by the space probe Voyager 2 in 1986, which managed to image around 35% of the moon's surface. There are no active plans at present to return to study the moon in more detail, although various concepts such as a Uranus Orbiter and Probe have been proposed.

Umbriel #242

Umbriel /ˈʌmbriəl/ is a moon of Uranus discovered on October 24, 1851, by William Lassell. It was discovered at the same time as Ariel and named after a character in Alexander Pope's poem The Rape of the Lock. Umbriel consists mainly of ice with a substantial fraction of rock, and may be differentiated into a rocky core and an icy mantle. The surface is the darkest among Uranian moons, and appears to have been shaped primarily by impacts. However, the presence of canyons suggests early endogenic processes, and the moon may have undergone an early endogenically driven resurfacing event that obliterated its older surface.

Titania #243

Titania (/təˈtɑːniə, təˈteɪniə/), also designated Uranus III, is the largest of the moons of Uranus and the eighth largest moon in the Solar System at a diameter of 1,578 kilometres (981 mi). Discovered by William Herschel in 1787, it is named after the queen of the fairies in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Its orbit lies inside Uranus's magnetosphere.

Oberon #244

Oberon /ˈoʊbərɒn/, also designated Uranus IV, is the outermost major moon of the planet Uranus. It is the second-largest and second most massive of the Uranian moons, and the ninth most massive moon in the Solar System. Discovered by William Herschel in 1787, Oberon is named after the mythical king of the fairies who appears as a character in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Its orbit lies partially outside Uranus's magnetosphere.

Francisco #245

Francisco is the innermost irregular satellite of Uranus. Francisco was discovered by Matthew J. Holman, et al. and Brett J. Gladman, et al. in 2003 from pictures taken in 2001 and given the provisional designation S/2001 U 3. Confirmed as Uranus XXII, it was named after a lord in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest.

Caliban #246

Caliban /ˈkælɪbæn/ is the second-largest retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus. It was discovered on 6 September 1997 by Brett J. Gladman, Philip D. Nicholson, Joseph A. Burns, and John J. Kavelaars using the 200-inch Hale telescope together with Sycorax and given the temporary designation S/1997 U 1. Designated Uranus XVI, it was named after the monster character in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest.

Stephano #247

Stephano /ˈstɛfənoʊ/ is a retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus. It was discovered by Brett J. Gladman, et al. in 1999, and given the provisional designation S/1999 U 2. Confirmed as Uranus XX, it was named after the drunken butler in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest in August 2000. The orbital parameters suggest that it may belong to the same dynamic cluster as Caliban, suggesting common origin.

Trinculo #248

Trinculo /ˈtrɪŋkjʊloʊ/ is a retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus. It was discovered by a group of astronomers led by Holman, et al. on 13 August 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 U 1. Confirmed as Uranus XXI, it was named after the drunken jester Trinculo in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest. Trinculo is the smallest of Uranus' 27 moons and is approximately only 18 km wide and is roughly the size of Manhattan Island.

Sycorax #249

Sycorax /ˈsɪkɒræks/ is the largest retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus. Sycorax was discovered on 6 September 1997 by Brett J. Gladman, Philip D. Nicholson, Joseph A. Burns, and John J. Kavelaars using the 200-inch Hale telescope, together with Caliban, and given the temporary designation S/1997 U 2.

Margaret #250

Margaret is the only known prograde irregular satellite of the moons of Uranus. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard, et al. in 2003 and given the provisional designation S/2003 U 3. Confirmed as Uranus XXIII, it was named after the servant of Hero in William Shakespeare's play Much Ado About Nothing.

Prospero #251

Prospero is a relatively small retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus discovered on 18 July 1999 by the astrophysicist Matthew Holman and his team, and given the provisional designation S/1999 U 3. Confirmed as Uranus XVIII it was named after the sorcerer Prospero in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest.

Setebos #252

Setebos /ˈsɛtɛbʌs/ is one of the outermost retrograde irregular satellites of Uranus. It was discovered on 18 July 1999 by John J. Kavelaars et al. and provisionally designated S/1999 U 1.

Ferdinand #253

Ferdinand is the outermost retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus. It was first seen near Uranus by Matthew J. Holman, John J. Kavelaars, Dan Milisavljevic, and Brett J. Gladman on August 13, 2001 and reobserved on September 21, 2001. The object was then lost with no confirmation it was actually orbiting around Uranus.

Metis #254

Metis /ˈmiːtəs/, also known as Jupiter XVI, is the innermost known moon of Jupiter. It was discovered in 1979 in images taken by Voyager 1, and was named in 1983 after the first wife of Zeus, Metis. Additional observations made between early 1996 and September 2003 by the Galileo spacecraft allowed its surface to be imaged.

Adrastea #255

Adrastea /ædrəˈstiːə/, also known as Jupiter XV, is the second by distance, and the smallest of the four inner moons of Jupiter. It was discovered in photographs taken by Voyager 2 in 1979, making it the first natural satellite to be discovered from images taken by an interplanetary spacecraft, rather than through a telescope. It was officially named after the mythological Adrasteia, foster mother of the Greek god Zeus—the equivalent of the Roman god Jupiter.

Amalthea #256

Amalthea /æməlˈθiːə/ is a moon of Jupiter. It has the third closest orbit around Jupiter among known moons and was the fifth moon of Jupiter to be discovered, so it is also known as Jupiter V. It is also the fifth largest moon of Jupiter, after the four Galilean Moons. Edward Emerson Barnard discovered the moon on 9 September 1892 and named it after Amalthea of Greek mythology. It was the last natural satellite to be discovered by direct visual observation; all later moons were discovered by photographic or digital imaging.

Thebe #257

Thebe /ˈθiːbiː/, also known as Jupiter XIV, is the fourth of Jupiter's moons by distance from the planet. It was discovered by Stephen P. Synnott in images from the Voyager 1 space probe taken on March 5, 1979, while making its flyby of Jupiter. In 1983, it was officially named after the mythological nymph Thebe.

Io #258

Io (/ˈaɪ.oʊ/), or Jupiter I, is the innermost and third-largest of the four Galilean moons of the planet Jupiter. Slightly larger than Earth’s moon, Io is the fourth-largest moon in the Solar System, has the highest density of any moon, the strongest surface gravity of any moon, and the lowest amount of water (by atomic ratio) of any known astronomical object in the Solar System. It was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei and was named after the mythological character Io, a priestess of Hera who became one of Zeus's lovers.

Europa #259

Europa /jʊˈroʊpə/ (listen), or Jupiter II, is the smallest of the four Galilean moons orbiting Jupiter, and the sixth-closest to the planet of all the 80 known moons of Jupiter. It is also the sixth-largest moon in the Solar System. Europa was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei and was named after Europa, the Phoenician mother of King Minos of Crete and lover of Zeus (the Greek equivalent of the Roman god Jupiter).

Ganymede #260

Ganymede, a satellite of Jupiter (Jupiter III), is the largest and most massive of the Solar System's moons. The ninth-largest object (including the Sun) of the Solar System, it is the largest without a substantial atmosphere (albeit not the most massive one, this is Mercury).

Callisto #261

Callisto (/kəˈlɪstoʊ/), or Jupiter IV, is the second-largest moon of Jupiter, after Ganymede. It is the third-largest moon in the Solar System after Ganymede and Saturn's largest moon Titan, and the largest object in the Solar System that may not be properly differentiated. Callisto was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei.

Themisto #262

Themisto /θəˈmɪstoʊ/, also known as Jupiter XVIII, is a small prograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered in 1975, subsequently lost, and rediscovered in 2000.

Leda #263

Leda /ˈliːdə/, also known as Jupiter XIII, is a prograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Charles T. Kowal at the Mount Palomar Observatory on September 14, 1974, after three nights' worth of photographic plates had been taken (September 11 through 13; Leda appears on all of them). It was named after Leda, who was raped by Zeus, the Greek equivalent of Jupiter (who came to her in the form of a swan). Kowal suggested the name and the IAU endorsed it in 1975.

Ersa #264

Ersa /ˈɜːrsə/, also Jupiter LXXI, originally known as S/2018 J 1, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team on 11 May 2018, and was later announced on 17 July 2018, via a Minor Planet Electronic Circular from the Minor Planet Center. It is about 3 kilometres (2 mi) in diameter and has an orbit radius of around 11,483,000 kilometres (7,135,000 miles); its orbital inclination is about 30.61°. It belongs to the Himalia group.

Himalia #265

Himalia (/hɪˈmeɪliə, hɪˈmɑːliə/), or Jupiter VI, is the largest irregular satellite of Jupiter, with a diameter of at least 140 km (90 mi). It is the sixth largest Jovian satellite, after the four Galilean moons and Amalthea. It was discovered by Charles Dillon Perrine at the Lick Observatory on 3 December 1904 and is named after the nymph Himalia, who bore three sons of Zeus (the Greek equivalent of Jupiter). It is one of the largest planetary moons in the Solar System not imaged in detail, and the third largest not imaged in detail within the orbit of Neptune.

Pandia #266

Pandia /pænˈdaɪə/, also known as Jupiter LXV, originally known as S/2017 J 4, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter, 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) in diameter, 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) in radius.

Lysithea #267

Lysithea /laɪˈsɪθiə/ is a prograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Seth Barnes Nicholson in 1938 at Mount Wilson Observatory and is named after the mythological Lysithea, daughter of Oceanus and one of Zeus' lovers.

Elara #268

Elara /ˈɛlərə/ is a prograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Charles Dillon Perrine at Lick Observatory in 1905 in photographs taken with the 36" Crossley reflecting telescope which he had recently rebuilt. It is the eighth-largest moon of Jupiter and is named after Elara, one of Zeus's lovers and the mother of the giant Tityos.

Dia #269

Dia /ˈdaɪ.ə/, also known as Jupiter LIII, is a prograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. Provisionally known as S/2000 J 11, it received its name on March 7, 2015. It is named after Dia, daughter of Deioneus (or Eioneus), wife of Ixion. According to Homer, she was seduced by Zeus in stallion form; Pirithous was the issue.

Carpo #270

Carpo /ˈkɑːrpoʊ/, also Jupiter XLVI, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003, and was provisionally designated as S/2003 J 20 until it received its name in early 2005.

Valetudo #271

Valetudo /væləˈtjuːdoʊ/, also known as Jupiter LXII and originally known as S/2016 J 2, is a moon of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team in data acquired by the 6.5-m Magellan-Baade telescope of the Las Campanas Observatory in 2016, but was not announced until 17 July 2018, via a Minor Planet Electronic Circular from the Minor Planet Center, which also reported the discovery of nine other Jupiter moons.

Euporie #272

Euporie /ˈjuːpəriː/, also known as Jupiter XXXIV, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 J 10.

Jupiter LV #273

Jupiter LV, provisionally known as S/2003 J 18, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers led by Brett J. Gladman in 2003.

Eupheme #274

Eupheme /juːˈfiːmiː/, also Jupiter LX, originally known as S/2003 J 3, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter, 2 km in diameter.

Jupiter LII #275

Jupiter LII, originally known as S/2010 J 2, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Christian Veillet in 2010. It received its permanent number in March 2015. It takes 1.69 years to orbit around Jupiter, and its average distance is 21.01 million km. Jupiter LII has a diameter of about 1 kilometer and in 2010 it was labeled the smallest known moon in the Solar System to have been discovered from Earth. It is a member of the Ananke group. Currently, Jupiter LII is the smallest known natural satellite of celestial bodies in our solar system.

Jupiter LIV, #276

Jupiter LIV, originally known as S/2016 J 1, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard in 2016, but not announced until June 2, 2017 via a Minor Planet Electronic Circular from the Minor Planet Center. It is about 1 kilometer in diameter and orbits at a semi-major axis of about 20,650,845 km with an inclination of about 139.8°. It belongs to the Ananke group.

Mneme #277

Mneme /ˈniːmiː/, also known as Jupiter XL, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by teams of astronomers led by Brett J. Gladman and Scott S. Sheppard in 2003, and was provisionally designated S/2003 J 21.

Euanthe #278

Euanthe /juːˈænθi/, also known as Jupiter XXXIII, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 J 7.

S/2003 J 16 #279

S/2003 J 16 is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers led by Brett J. Gladman in 2003.

Harpalyke #280

Harpalyke /hɑːrˈpæləkiː/, also known as Jupiter XXII, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 J 5. In August 2003, the moon was named after Harpalyke, the incestuous daughter of Clymenus, who in some accounts was also a lover of Zeus (Jupiter).

Orthosie #281

Orthosie /ɔːrˈθoʊziː/, also known as Jupiter XXXV, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 J 9.

Praxidike #282

Praxidike /prækˈsɪdəkiː/, also known as Jupiter XXVII, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 J 7. It was named in August 2003 after Praxidike, the Greek goddess of punishment.

Helike #283

Helike /ˈhɛləkiː/, also known as Jupiter XLV, is a moon of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003, and given the temporary designation S/2003 J 6.

Jupiter LXIV #284

Jupiter LXIV, originally known as S/2017 J 3, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team in 2017, but not announced until July 17, 2018 via a Minor Planet Electronic Circular from the Minor Planet Center. It is about 2 kilometers in diameter and orbits at a semi-major axis of about 20,694,000 km with an inclination of about 147.9°. It belongs to the Ananke group.

S/2003 J 12 #285

S/2003 J 12 is a natural satellite of Jupiter, and is one of the smallest known natural satellites in the Solar System. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003.

Jupiter LXVIII #286

Jupiter LXVIII, provisionally known as S/2017 J 7, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team in 2017, but not announced until July 17, 2018, via a Minor Planet Electronic Circular from the Minor Planet Center. It is about 2 kilometers in diameter and orbits at a semi-major axis of about 20,627,000 km with an inclination of about 143.4°. It belongs to the Ananke group.

Thelxinoe #287

Thelxinoe /θɛlkˈsɪnoʊ.iː/, also known as Jupiter XLII, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2004 from pictures taken in 2003, and originally received the temporary designation S/2003 J 22.

Thyone #288

Thyone /θaɪˈoʊniː/, also known as Jupiter XXIX, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 J 2.hg

S/2003 J 2 #289

S/2003 J 2 is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. The moon was discovered on 5 February 2003 by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard and David C. Jewitt, and was later announced on 4 March 2003. It was initially thought to be Jupiter's outermost known moon until recovery observations disproved this in 2020.

Ananke #290

Ananke /əˈnæŋki/ is a retrograde irregular moon of Jupiter. It was discovered by Seth Barnes Nicholson at Mount Wilson Observatory in 1951 and is named after the mythological Ananke, the personification of Necessity, and the mother of the Moirai (Fates) by Zeus. The adjectival form of the name is Anankean.

Iocaste #291

Iocaste, also known as Jupiter XXIV, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii including: David C. Jewitt, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Eugene Magnier led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2000, and given the temporary designation S/2000 J 3.

Hermippe #292

Hermippe /hɜːrˈmɪpiː/, or Jupiter XXX, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered concurrently with Eurydome by a team of astronomers from the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Hawaii led by David Jewitt and Scott S. Sheppard and Jan Kleyna in 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 J 3.

Jupiter LXX #293

Jupiter LXX, originally known as S/2017 J 9, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team in 2017, but not announced until July 17, 2018, via a Minor Planet Electronic Circular from the Minor Planet Center. It is about 3 kilometers in diameter and orbits at a semi-major axis of about 21,487,000 km with an inclination of about 152.7°. It belongs to the Ananke group.

Philophrosyne #294

Philophrosyne (/fɪləˈfrɒsəniː/ or /fɪləˈfrɒzəniː/), also Jupiter LVIII and provisionally known as S/2003 J 15, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard, et al. in 2003, but then lost. It was recovered in 2017 and given its permanent designation that year.

Pasithee #295

Pasithee /ˈpæsəθiː/, also known as Jupiter XXXVIII, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 J 6.

Jupiter LXIX #296

Jupiter LXIX, originally known as S/2017 J 8, is an outer natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team in 2017, but not announced until July 17, 2018, via a Minor Planet Electronic Circular from the Minor Planet Center. It is about 1 kilometer in diameter and orbits at a semi-major axis of about 23,232,700 km with an inclination of about 164.7°. It belongs to the Carme group.

S/2003 J 24 #297

S/2003 J 24 (temporarily named EJc0061) is a moon of Jupiter, discovered by Scott S. Sheppard et al. in 2003. It was independently found by amateur astronomer Kai Ly, who reported it on June 30, 2021. It was formally announced on 15 November 2021 in the MPEC.

Eurydome #298

Eurydome /jʊˈrɪdəmiː/, also known as Jupiter XXXII, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered concurrently with Hermippe by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 J 4.

Jupiter LVI #299

Jupiter LVI, provisionally known as S/2011 J 2, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by Scott Sheppard in 2011. Images of the newly discovered moon were captured using the Magellan-Baade telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. It is an irregular moon with a retrograde orbit. The discovery of Jupiter LVI brought the Jovian satellite count to 67. It is one of the outer retrograde swarm of objects orbiting Jupiter and belongs to the Pasiphae group.

S/2003 J 4 #300

S/2003 J 4 is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003.